Gary Winger is the owner of GW Performance.  He is an authorized service center and retail supplier for Integra Shocks.  He has extensive experience in the shock business.

 

CI:  As a shock guy, what is the question you get asked most often?

GW:  I get asked all the time about how much needs to be adjusted from the beginning to the end of a night at the races.

CI:  So, how much needs to be adjusted from beginning to end?

GW:  There's no real right answer.  Each situation is different.  The biggest factors are the tire rules and the track surface more than anything else.

A lot of guys don't understand shocks.  I see some guys who automatically adjust to the max and want more.  Other guys start with a small adjustment, see improvement, and then think that if a little is good, then a lot is better. 

I encourage guys to think for themselves and learn about their equipment.  The most successful teams spend time and effort up front to learn about their shocks and how the adjustments react in different conditions.  The truth is, you shouldn't have to adjust much.

CI:  How has the higher price of shocks had an effect on racers?

GW:  Back when everyone had $200 double-adjustable shocks, racers weren’t scared of them.  Now, with higher priced shocks, they’re scared to mess with them.

CI:  We hear a lot of talk about “saving the racers money,” especially when it comes to shocks.  What are your thoughts on that?

GW:  I’m torn.  In some ways, it makes me laugh.  I don’t know of any racing on a level playing field where the racers save money.  Look at NASCAR, for instance.  That’s as level as it gets and those are the most expensive cars out there.  When it comes to shocks, in particular, there is not another product manufacturer out there who supports their products as much as shock manufacturers do.  I personally attended 90 races last season.  Shocks are also a one-time expense.

When I hear comments from some of the super late model guys, it makes no sense.  They talk about the high price of shocks, yet they are getting theirs for free and they show up at the track in million-dollar toter homes.

In the shock world, we can’t fall behind.  With the tight competition, we can fall behind in a weekend if we don’t stay on top of it.

CI:  What do you think of shock claim rules or limiting the price of shocks?

GW:  I’m not against $200 shocks.  But, it’s a double-edged sword.  The truth of the matter is that guys would then buy 20 of them unless you limit the number of shocks, the valving, etc.  Most claim rules don’t work because of gentlemen’s agreements between the racers.  Interestingly, the most expensive shock we sell is a canister shock.

For the crate guys, 90% of them buy their shocks from super late model teams at $400 each instead of $900.

CI:  What are your thoughts on the future of crate racing?

GW:  I think it could be really good.  I would like to see the direction changed just a bit.  Why have a class with a big spoiler and the same tires as what the supers run?  Right now there is more spoiler and tire than the engine can handle and it just gets guys to wreck each other.  Smaller tires and a smaller spoiler would help. 

 For more information about Gary Winger and GW Performance, you can visit his website at www.teamgw.com.

 

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Gary Winger is the owner of GW Performance.  He is an authorized service center and retail supplier for Integra Shocks.  He has extensive experience in the shock business.

CI:  As a shock guy, what is the question you get asked most often?

GW:  I get asked all the time about how much needs to be adjusted from the beginning to the end of a night at the races.

CI:  So, how much needs to be adjusted from beginning to end?

GW:  There's no real right answer.  Each situation is different.  The biggest factors are the tire rules and the track surface more than anything else.

A lot of guys don't understand shocks.  I see some guys who automatically adjust to the max and want more.  Other guys start with a small adjustment, see improvement, and then think that if a little is good, then a lot is better. 

I encourage guys to think for themselves and learn about their equipment.  The most successful teams spend time and effort up front to learn about their shocks and how the adjustments react in different conditions.  The truth is, you shouldn't have to adjust much.

CI:  How has the higher price of shocks had an effect on racers?

GW:  Back when everyone had $200 double-adjustable shocks, racers weren’t scared of them.  Now, with higher priced shocks, they’re scared to mess with them.

 

CI:  We hear a lot of talk about “saving the racers money,” especially when it comes to shocks.  What are your thoughts on that?

GW:  I’m torn.  In some ways, it makes me laugh.  I don’t know of any racing on a level playing field where the racers save money.  Look at NASCAR, for instance.  That’s as level as it gets and those are the most expensive cars out there.  When it comes to shocks, in particular, there is not another product manufacturer out there who supports their products as much as shock manufacturers do.  I personally attended 90 races last season.  Shocks are also a one-time expense.

When I hear comments from some of the super late model guys, it makes no sense.  They talk about the high price of shocks, yet they are getting theirs for free and they show up at the track in million-dollar toter homes.

In the shock world, we can’t fall behind.  With the tight competition, we can fall behind in a weekend if we don’t stay on top of it.

 CI:  What do you think of shock claim rules or limiting the price of shocks?

GW:  I’m not against $200 shocks.  But, it’s a double-edged sword.  The truth of the matter is that guys would then buy 20 of them unless you limit the number of shocks, the valving, etc.  Most claim rules don’t work because of gentlemen’s agreements between the racers.  Interestingly, the most expensive shock we sell is a canister shock.

 For the crate guys, 90% of them buy their shocks from super late model teams at $400 each instead of $900.

 CI:  What are your thoughts on the future of crate racing?

GW:  I think it could be really good.  I would like to see the direction changed just a bit.  Why have a class with a big spoiler and the same tires as what the supers run?  Right now there is more spoiler and tire than the engine can handle and it just gets guys to wreck each other.  Smaller tires and a smaller spoiler would help. 

 

 For more information about Gary Winger and GW Performance, you can visit his website at www.teamgw.com.